Tag Archive | sweet

review: The Bro-Magnet


The Bro-Magnet -by- Lauren Baratz-Logsted
(Published by TKA Distribution) 

My grade: 3 1/2 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  Women have been known to lament, “Always a bridesmaid, never a bride.” For Johnny Smith, the problem is, “Always a Best Man, never a groom.” At age 33, housepainter Johnny has been Best Man eight times. The ultimate man’s man, Johnny loves the Mets, the Jets, his weekly poker game, and the hula girl lamp that hangs over his basement pool table. Johnny has the instant affection of nearly every man he meets, but one thing he doesn’t have is a woman to share his life with, and he wants that desperately…

 I GREW UP AS THE OLDEST of four daughters. My mum has three sisters and only one of them has a son – the rest of my cousins are female.  So with that background I particularly enjoy books from a male main character’s point of view. Johnny (or John, as he decides to go by, in order to project a more mature image) has an endearing voice. Just like all the guys -bros- that he comes across, I find him charming and endearing and I really want to be his friend. And, I think that is one of the problems I have with this book. Johnny is like the brother I never had and he is not convincing -to me- as a romantic lead.

Some might argue that this is supposed to be a romantic comedy first and foremost, and I agree that many scenes in this book are funny. There is a thin line you have to walk in order for the hilarious situations that ensue (a date at the opera in a barn with a pair of siblings performing multiple roles, for instance) not becoming over the top and too unrealistic, and the author does this very well. I think, however, that Johnny’s long-time crush could have been painted with a somewhat finer brush to be more effective.

Just like many a romantic comedy herione needs a gay best friend, so does a hero. Johnny’s neighbour, sometime employee and BFF Sam is a lesbian. She is also very self assured – almost like a guy, actually, and very attractive. She has just come out of a failed relationship and is also wondering what she is doing wrong. As Johnny goes about trying to turn himself into the man that he thinks that Helen – the love interest – wants, Sam assists him and also applies some of the helpful hints he picks up along the way.  The banter between Johnny and Sam is something that I enjoyed a lot, almost to the point where I was rooting for the outcome that Sam would be a closet bi-sexual person and she and Johnny would be an item at the end. But, of course she is not.

Another problem I had with the book is that I don’t feel what Johnny feels about Helen – he tells me/the reader how he reacts and what he thinks about and his hopes for this relationship, but when we reach the butterfly in the tummy moments; the first kiss and when they finally progress to a more physical relationship, he tells me that as well. The door is closed.

When I say that I had some problems with the book, I don’t mean that I am disappointed – it was a thoroughly enjoyable and easy read. It brought out a lot of smiles an d giggles and left me with a happy feeling. But, at the end of the day I do wish that there had been a little more romance to this comedy.

(read in January 2012)

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review: The Winter Sea

The Winter Sea -by- Susanna Kearsley
(Published by Sourcebooks Landmark) 

My grade: 4 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  History has all but forgotten…

In the spring of 1708, an invading Jacobite fleet of French and Scottish soldiers nearly succeeded in landing the exiled James Stewart in Scotland to reclaim his crown.

Now, Carrie McClelland hopes to turn that story into her next bestselling novel.

***

THIS BOOK HAS A LOT OF MY FAVOURITE INGREDIENTS: Scottish history mixed with the present day and it is told from first person’s pov. At least part of it. The author has done her research very, very thoroughly and I could definitely see very clearly all the details from both the past and the present day surroundings.

Carrie is a successful author. She is Canadian of Scottish/Irish heritage currently residing in France and writing a book set in the time of the first Jacobite uprising in 1708. But she has writer’s block.
During a visit to her agent in the north of Scotland (she is the godmother of her agent’s baby boy), she gets fascinated by the castle of Slains, is drawn to it so much that she nearly gets lost and misses the christening. She meets a man who – despite it being a very quick meeting where he points her in the right direction – makes a lasting impression on her.

She gets inspired to continue writing in Scotland, packs up her stuff in France and rents a little cottage near the castle of Slains.
While she is writing her book, featuring her ancestor Sophia, she discovers that she has inherited – there is no other explanation – Sophias memories. And Sophia’s story and her part in the failed expedition in 1708 unfolds while in present day Carrie meets the the sons of her landlord who both take an interest in her.

I found the switching back and forth in time a bit irritating – just as I was getting involved in Sophia’s life we switch back to Carrie and so forth. Sophia’s episodes gets longer and longer, though.
She is a bit pale and quiet in the beginning and we find out why this is so. But she grows and fills out and becomes more and more interesting. Carrie, however, I can’t get a grip on. Maybe I missed something (I read too quickly at times), but I cannot tell you what she looks like. Unfortunately (for me) she started looking a bit like Diana Bishop from “A Discovery of Witches” in my head. I guess I felt that they were equally disinterested in their looks and clothes.

If you are into history and liked Outlander, this is a book for you. Be prepared to miss out on the detailed sex, however, you have to use your own imagination!.

(read in April 2011)

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review: House Keeper’s Happy-Ever-After

House Keepers Happy Ever After -by- Fiona Harper

My grade: 3 1/2 stars

GoodReads Blurb: Ellie Bond’s heart has ached ever since she lost her beloved husband and little girl. Now her head is telling her it’s time to get her life back on track. Her first small step: answering big-shot music executive Mark Wilder’s Housekeeper Wanted advertisement!

I WOULD HAVE GIVEN this book four stars if I had connected more with the male protagonist Mark. I’m not saying it’s the author’s fault, I just felt he was not believable enough. Also, I’m kind of wondering what Ellie was doing as a housekeeper when he was gone so much. She didn’t do any cleaning and very little cooking.
Just drank a whole lotta cups of tea and ate chocolate biscuits. Odd. Maybe one should become a housekeeper in one’s next career change.

But I digress.

Ellie, on the other hand, comes across as a three dimensional person. Having a little girl myself, I could really picture the enormous weight of grief she struggled with, having lost the two most precious people in her life. And the way she really made an effort trying to work around the effects the accident had on her memory and thought processes was extremely well done.

They both had to take a step back, examine their past and present and work out their issues with trust/grief in order to come together in a HEA and it was very, very sweet.

(read in August 2011)