review: Daughter of Smoke and Bone


Daughter of Smoke and Bone
 (Smoke and Bone #1) -by- Laini Taylor
(Published by Little, Brown & Co) 

My grade: 5 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  Around the world, black handprints are appearing on doorways, scorched there by winged strangers
who have crept through a slit in the sky. In a dark and dusty shop, a devil’s supply of human teeth grown dangerously low.
And in the tangled lanes of Prague, a young art student is about to be caught up in a brutal otherwordly war.

Meet Karou. She fills her sketchbooks with monsters that may or may not be real; she’s prone to disappearing on mysterious “errands”; she speaks many languages–not all of them human;
and her bright blue hair actually grows out of her head that color.

Who is she? That is the question that haunts her, and she’s about to find out.

WOW

I had a hard time thinking of reading another book after finishing Daughter of Smoke and Bone. This is the most fantastic read of 2011 for me.

***
The writing is utterly beautiful. The chapters so smooth as if they just lined up effortlessly. The words just flowed from the pages through me and touched me.
I can’t explain it, and I think it is quite amazing how one work of fiction can evoke so many emotions, but I felt like I had been there before. Not like a trope that has been used time and time again or a set-up that felt old and familiar and completely unsurprising.
But somehow it felt like coming home, like I’d walked those winding streets of Prague along Karou before.

At a first glance, Karou may be someone to envy. She is young, beautiful and talented, she has a wonderful best friend and her own flat in Prague, decorated with artifacts and knick-knacks that she has picked up from her “trips” around the world.
But there is a sadness surrounding her and a part missing inside her.

She has to keep one of her realities unknown to the humans around her.
Karou was raised by the chimaera Brimstone in his workshop in Prague. But this workshop is also in many other cities in countries around the world. The front door can open to any of these cities and let Karou – who is not part human and part animal like the chimaera – out on a mission. What does Brimstone actually do with the stuff – most of it teeth – that Karou picks up for him? He pays for them with wishes, but no magic comes without suffering. Karou has seen some terrible things on her collection errands, and she tries to not dwell on them and comforts herself that things worked out well for those who had lost their teeth, unwillingly.

Where does the other door in Brimstone’s study – the one that Karou has never seen open – really lead?

As the book blurb states, black hand-prints start to appear on doorways around the world. On a trip to Marrakesh, where Karou meets with the only one of the human sellers of teeth that she has ever liked, (and who, by the way, is quite obsessed with the connection mustache =clever man: Nietzsche, Twain…), she becomes the target of the seraphim Akiva. He injures her and while she recuperates in the workshop – from which Brimstone is curiously absent – she gets a glimpse of another world before being unceremoniously turfed out by Brimstone and basically told she is not welcome again.

From here, the story shifts up to a faster pace and the plot thickens. It turns out that Akiva might just know who she is, but will she like what it is he has to tell her?

This book took hold of me and did not let go, still hasn’t. It is magical, it has loss and sorrow, friendship and impossible love. It is about the cost of war, about trust and betrayal and getting up and doing something about it.

Read it – you won’t regret i!

(read in October 2011)

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review: The Winter Sea

The Winter Sea -by- Susanna Kearsley
(Published by Sourcebooks Landmark) 

My grade: 4 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  History has all but forgotten…

In the spring of 1708, an invading Jacobite fleet of French and Scottish soldiers nearly succeeded in landing the exiled James Stewart in Scotland to reclaim his crown.

Now, Carrie McClelland hopes to turn that story into her next bestselling novel.

***

THIS BOOK HAS A LOT OF MY FAVOURITE INGREDIENTS: Scottish history mixed with the present day and it is told from first person’s pov. At least part of it. The author has done her research very, very thoroughly and I could definitely see very clearly all the details from both the past and the present day surroundings.

Carrie is a successful author. She is Canadian of Scottish/Irish heritage currently residing in France and writing a book set in the time of the first Jacobite uprising in 1708. But she has writer’s block.
During a visit to her agent in the north of Scotland (she is the godmother of her agent’s baby boy), she gets fascinated by the castle of Slains, is drawn to it so much that she nearly gets lost and misses the christening. She meets a man who – despite it being a very quick meeting where he points her in the right direction – makes a lasting impression on her.

She gets inspired to continue writing in Scotland, packs up her stuff in France and rents a little cottage near the castle of Slains.
While she is writing her book, featuring her ancestor Sophia, she discovers that she has inherited – there is no other explanation – Sophias memories. And Sophia’s story and her part in the failed expedition in 1708 unfolds while in present day Carrie meets the the sons of her landlord who both take an interest in her.

I found the switching back and forth in time a bit irritating – just as I was getting involved in Sophia’s life we switch back to Carrie and so forth. Sophia’s episodes gets longer and longer, though.
She is a bit pale and quiet in the beginning and we find out why this is so. But she grows and fills out and becomes more and more interesting. Carrie, however, I can’t get a grip on. Maybe I missed something (I read too quickly at times), but I cannot tell you what she looks like. Unfortunately (for me) she started looking a bit like Diana Bishop from “A Discovery of Witches” in my head. I guess I felt that they were equally disinterested in their looks and clothes.

If you are into history and liked Outlander, this is a book for you. Be prepared to miss out on the detailed sex, however, you have to use your own imagination!.

(read in April 2011)

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review: Angelfall

Angelfall (Penryn & the End of Days #1) -by- Susan Ee
(Published by Ace) 

My grade: 5 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  It’s been six weeks since angels of the apocalypse descended to demolish the modern world. Street gangs rule the day while fear and superstition rule the night. When warrior angels fly away with a helpless little girl, her seventeen-year-old sister Penryn will do anything to get her back.
Anything, including making a deal with an enemy angel. 

ABSOLUTELY RIVETING READ, I lay awake until 03.15 in the morning to finish this one. It was worth it.

In northern California, Silicon Valley, we find Penryn and her family; her wheelchair bound younger sister and her schizophrenic mother, as they are leaving their flat where they have camped out following the attacks on earth by angels not long previously. Hardly any modern conveniences work – electricity and hot water are sporadic, cars are abandoned in big pile-ups on the streets; shops are looted, and gangs roam the neighbourhoods.  Penryn, who is basically the head of the family, has decided that they stand a better chance at surviving if they try and make it into  the forested hills. However, it is hard to be sneaky when your sister is in a wheelchair, and your mother is pulling a shopping trolley that she refuses to part with.

Why did the angels attack? We are not sure. A lot of the background details as well as Penryn’s personal history is revealed as the story unfolds. No infodumping here, it all feels natural in Penryn’s strong and clear voice. I have so much admiration for her, as she soldiers on during really tough circumstances. She doesn’t pretend that she is a hero, or that she wants to save the world. Her interest is keeping her family -such as it is- together and safe. She does not come across as bitter, but matter-of-factly states the things she has missed out on:

 “I am, of course, rooting for the humans. But I already have more responsibilities than I can handle. I just want be an ordinary girl living an ordinary life. My biggest concern in life should be what dress to wear to the prom, not how to escape a paramilitary camp to rescue my sister from cruel angels, and certainly not joining a resistance army to beat back an invasion to save humanity. I know my limits and that goes way beyond them.”

This book is not about sweet angels. They are as cruel and twisted and selfish and ambitious as us humans can be. There are also  some pretty gruesome scenes, they brought to my mind the sometimes extremely graphic details of the horrors that Kate Daniels comes face-to-face with in Ilona Andrews’s books. These scenes give the book a depth I often miss in YA where the challenges facing the main character are not believably difficult for me. There are no invincible warriors here (though the angels are certainly made of stern stuff and are able to heal much faster than a human) and no one – not even the angels – has the answers to everything.

So Penryn’s little sister has been kidnapped, and she keeps moving, determined to get to the angel head camp in San Francisco. On the way, she is detained with a group of people organizing a  resistance against the angel occupation. This book is filled with wry and sometimes dark humour and in this camp, she comes across a pair of twin brothers, who illustrate this:

I’m Tweedledee,” says one.
“I’m Tweedledum,” says the other. “Most people call us Dee-Dum for short since they can’t tell us apart.”
“Why would you call yourselves that?”
Dee shrugs. “New world, new names. We were going to be Gog and Magog”
“Those were our online names,” says Dum.
“But why go all doom and gloom?” asks Dee.
“Used to be fun being Gog and Magog when the world was Tiffany-twisted and suburban-simple,” says Dum. “But now…”
“Not so much,” says Dee.
“Death and destruction are so blasé.”

“So mainstream.”

This journey that she has undertaken, with her crazy mother hovering nearby (leaving clues to let Penryn know), is done in the company of the angel Raffe. Penryn realizes reluctantly that she needs to try and save him so that he can tell her how to get her sister back. Their attitude to each other is suspicious at first, but a mutual respect develops during the course of their travels.

If you are looking for a fast-paced, dark and sinister but yet funny and extremely entertaining “angel dystopia”, Angelfall is definitely for you. Sturdier than Divergent and funnier that The Hunger Games. It is one of my favourite reads of 2011.

(read in December 2011)

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(currently only available from Amazon and Kobo)

review: Making Waves

Making Waves -by- Tawna Fenske
(Published by Sourcebooks) 

My grade: 4 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  When Alex Bradshaw’s unscrupulous boss kicks him to the curb after 20 faithful years as an executive with the world’s largest shipping company, he sets out to reclaim his dignity and his pension. Assembling a team of fellow corporate castoffs, he sails to the Caribbean to intercept an illegal diamond shipment. None of them counted on quirky blonde stowaway Juli Flynn, who has a perplexing array of talents, a few big secrets, and an intoxicating romantic chemistry with Alex… 

THIS WAS VERY DIFFERENT. A 37-year-old job-hopping heroine looking to bring her wacky uncle’s ashes to their last resting place in the ocean outside a Caribbean island. a 42-year-old former VP looking for revenge on his old employer as well as getting his nest-egg back.

The setting is wonderful, it really made me want to go on a Caribbean vacation. The sidekicks are also unusual and interesting. It is a bit of slapstick to this comical romance, but it is done with such a deft hand that I really don’t mind.

I wasn’t entirely sure of how things were going to play out until the end, at one point I actually thought their was a traitor in the good pirates’ midst.
Now that I think about it, this book would actually make a really fun, romantic comedy.!

(read in August 2011)

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review: The Shadow Reader

The Shadow Reader (McKenzie Lewis #1) -by- Sandy Williams
(Published by Ace) 

My grade: 4 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  Some humans can see the fae. McKenzie Lewis can track them, reading the shadows they leave behind. But some shadows lead to danger. Others lead to lies.
A Houston college student trying to finish her degree, McKenzie has been working for the fae king for years, tracking vicious rebels who would claim the Realm. Her job isn’t her only secret. For just as long, she’s been in love with Kyol, the king’s sword-master—and relationships between humans and fae are forbidden. 

THIS STORY COMMENCES with our heroine McKenzie having yet another exam ruined as she is summoned by the fae court in the middle of an English test. Turns out that the fae rebels have found out about her whereabouts. As a Shadow Reader (nalkin-shom) for the fae king Athroth, McKenzie is able to draw and pin-point the location to which rebels fae go when they disappear (fissure) from fights, thus enabling the court fae to catch up on them (and sometimes do not so nice things to them). The fae rebels are not so happy with that. The court fae, among them her 10-year-long crush – the King’s Sword Master Kyol – try to hurry her along to safety across the campus. In vain. McKenzie finds herself kidnapped by the fae rebel leader Aren.

Let’s pause here for a moment and think about what we know about Faery – or The Realm, as it is referred to a lot in this book.

In all the various fae books I have read, there is basically just one piece of land/country – Faery. In some books it is situated in pockets of magical otherland, remaining from the time when the world was born. In a large number of books it is on another plane/dimension.  But, there is always just one country. Sometimes it is divided, traditionally, between the dark and the light fae, but a lot of the time it is just one, single ruler. I just thought that was worth pondering about.

Anywho. The Shadow Reader’s Faery strikes me as a sort of more advanced medieval society. Probably because “tech” tends to screw up the magic of the Fae (or so the present king would like to have everyone believe). People go about their daily grind unaided by such things as washers and cappuccino makers. Not so sure about toilets. (See below). A human like McKenzie – though “gifted” with the ability to read shadows, needs to pass into the realm in the company of a fae, she must have an imprinted destination stone with her in order to not get lost in the “in between” (think: the world in ice as per “The Day After Tomorrow). But Fae can fissure back and forth between Faery and Earth, and do that quite a lot in the fighting sequences (in order to avoid arrows and lunges with swords from the opponents). Interesting to note is that a fae, deadly wounded, disappears like smoke “into the ether” when he/she finally passes on. No burial costs.

McKenzie is not very happy being held hostage with the rebels, who are camping out in the middle of a forest in Germany. And not all rebels are very happy to have her there either, and would rather Aren got rid of her once and for all. McKenzie tries to get away several times, and this in addition to the various fighting scenes and other situations requiring a hasty retreat, gets her in to the top list of very injured human heroines – right after Cassie Palmer in Karen Chance’s paranormal series. Luckily for McKenzie, Aren possesses the rare fae magic of being able to heal injuries.

Another little pause – let’s ponder the basic human needs – eat, sleep and potty breaks.
I am sorry to bring the latter up, but I feel I must.
I don’t have to or even want to read about how people in books sleep, eat, go to the toilet and shower all the time. It can certainly be too much – I got very tired reading about what Bella in Twilight was eating all the time.
But – in this story McKenzie talks about her lack of sleep or bad sleep, being locked up for several days in a room, I rather miss that information. We do not know what the rebels feed her most of the time and she never-ever has to go to the bathroom. A trip to the loo could provide her with yet another chance to escape, but she never thought about that. Obviously.

As the story unfolds, McKenzie finds herself examining – sometimes reluctantly –  whether everything she learnt, basically since the very impressionable age of 16, of the rebels and their intentions and actions is the whole truth. Aren arranges for her to learn the fae language – something the king did not think was necessary. According to the king – fae and humans should not mix more than necessary, but McKenzie is surprised to find that all fae do not share this view.

The love triangle….

McKenzie and Kyol go back a long time, but McKenzie has always known that there can never be a happy ending for them. Or can it?
Enter Aren, sexy and smoldering. McKenzie fights the attraction she feels for him, denying it even. . .

I thoroughly enjoyed the Shadow Reader and am very eager to read the sequel in this series!

(read in November 2011)

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review: The Restorer

The Restorer -by- Amanda Stevens

My grade: 5 stars

GoodReads Blurb: My name is Amelia Gray. I’m a cemetery restorer who sees ghosts. In order to protect myself from the parasitic nature of the dead, I’ve always held fast to the rules passed down from my father. But now a haunted police detective has entered my world and everything is changing, including the rules that have always kept me safe.

IF IT IS a book that you cannot stop reading, it is a good book.
That’s how I see it.
From the moment I woke up to the moment I put my head on the pillow, I wanted to keep reading The Restorer.

I happen to not agree with the writer/narrative is saying about ghosts and why some people can see them and what to do. But, imo, it does not matter.

This is a fast-paced mystery-thriller-paranormal about Amelia – who knows that she is different, and that she has been, ever since she had her first ghost-sighting. She is a graveyard restorer and this story deals with what happens when corpses turn up in a graveyard that she is currently restoring.

What I really like about this book is that I felt that I saw what Amelia, saw, felt her emotions and worried about and feared the same things she did. The author put me right in her head and heart.

Also, I have never been in the south, but this book really made me want to read more about and visit Charleston. Fantastic narrative.

I do not want to go into any more details about the story, for fear of spoiling it for you guys. But this book is really, really good if you like your paranormal with a twist of ghosties, thriller and some hard-to-resist attraction.

Eagerly awaiting the sequel!

(read in May 2011)

The book will be available from AdLibris.se in February 2012

review: House Keeper’s Happy-Ever-After

House Keepers Happy Ever After -by- Fiona Harper

My grade: 3 1/2 stars

GoodReads Blurb: Ellie Bond’s heart has ached ever since she lost her beloved husband and little girl. Now her head is telling her it’s time to get her life back on track. Her first small step: answering big-shot music executive Mark Wilder’s Housekeeper Wanted advertisement!

I WOULD HAVE GIVEN this book four stars if I had connected more with the male protagonist Mark. I’m not saying it’s the author’s fault, I just felt he was not believable enough. Also, I’m kind of wondering what Ellie was doing as a housekeeper when he was gone so much. She didn’t do any cleaning and very little cooking.
Just drank a whole lotta cups of tea and ate chocolate biscuits. Odd. Maybe one should become a housekeeper in one’s next career change.

But I digress.

Ellie, on the other hand, comes across as a three dimensional person. Having a little girl myself, I could really picture the enormous weight of grief she struggled with, having lost the two most precious people in her life. And the way she really made an effort trying to work around the effects the accident had on her memory and thought processes was extremely well done.

They both had to take a step back, examine their past and present and work out their issues with trust/grief in order to come together in a HEA and it was very, very sweet.

(read in August 2011)