review: The Shadow Reader

The Shadow Reader (McKenzie Lewis #1) -by- Sandy Williams
(Published by Ace) 

My grade: 4 stars

GoodReads Blurb:  Some humans can see the fae. McKenzie Lewis can track them, reading the shadows they leave behind. But some shadows lead to danger. Others lead to lies.
A Houston college student trying to finish her degree, McKenzie has been working for the fae king for years, tracking vicious rebels who would claim the Realm. Her job isn’t her only secret. For just as long, she’s been in love with Kyol, the king’s sword-master—and relationships between humans and fae are forbidden. 

THIS STORY COMMENCES with our heroine McKenzie having yet another exam ruined as she is summoned by the fae court in the middle of an English test. Turns out that the fae rebels have found out about her whereabouts. As a Shadow Reader (nalkin-shom) for the fae king Athroth, McKenzie is able to draw and pin-point the location to which rebels fae go when they disappear (fissure) from fights, thus enabling the court fae to catch up on them (and sometimes do not so nice things to them). The fae rebels are not so happy with that. The court fae, among them her 10-year-long crush – the King’s Sword Master Kyol – try to hurry her along to safety across the campus. In vain. McKenzie finds herself kidnapped by the fae rebel leader Aren.

Let’s pause here for a moment and think about what we know about Faery – or The Realm, as it is referred to a lot in this book.

In all the various fae books I have read, there is basically just one piece of land/country – Faery. In some books it is situated in pockets of magical otherland, remaining from the time when the world was born. In a large number of books it is on another plane/dimension.  But, there is always just one country. Sometimes it is divided, traditionally, between the dark and the light fae, but a lot of the time it is just one, single ruler. I just thought that was worth pondering about.

Anywho. The Shadow Reader’s Faery strikes me as a sort of more advanced medieval society. Probably because “tech” tends to screw up the magic of the Fae (or so the present king would like to have everyone believe). People go about their daily grind unaided by such things as washers and cappuccino makers. Not so sure about toilets. (See below). A human like McKenzie – though “gifted” with the ability to read shadows, needs to pass into the realm in the company of a fae, she must have an imprinted destination stone with her in order to not get lost in the “in between” (think: the world in ice as per “The Day After Tomorrow). But Fae can fissure back and forth between Faery and Earth, and do that quite a lot in the fighting sequences (in order to avoid arrows and lunges with swords from the opponents). Interesting to note is that a fae, deadly wounded, disappears like smoke “into the ether” when he/she finally passes on. No burial costs.

McKenzie is not very happy being held hostage with the rebels, who are camping out in the middle of a forest in Germany. And not all rebels are very happy to have her there either, and would rather Aren got rid of her once and for all. McKenzie tries to get away several times, and this in addition to the various fighting scenes and other situations requiring a hasty retreat, gets her in to the top list of very injured human heroines – right after Cassie Palmer in Karen Chance’s paranormal series. Luckily for McKenzie, Aren possesses the rare fae magic of being able to heal injuries.

Another little pause – let’s ponder the basic human needs – eat, sleep and potty breaks.
I am sorry to bring the latter up, but I feel I must.
I don’t have to or even want to read about how people in books sleep, eat, go to the toilet and shower all the time. It can certainly be too much – I got very tired reading about what Bella in Twilight was eating all the time.
But – in this story McKenzie talks about her lack of sleep or bad sleep, being locked up for several days in a room, I rather miss that information. We do not know what the rebels feed her most of the time and she never-ever has to go to the bathroom. A trip to the loo could provide her with yet another chance to escape, but she never thought about that. Obviously.

As the story unfolds, McKenzie finds herself examining – sometimes reluctantly –  whether everything she learnt, basically since the very impressionable age of 16, of the rebels and their intentions and actions is the whole truth. Aren arranges for her to learn the fae language – something the king did not think was necessary. According to the king – fae and humans should not mix more than necessary, but McKenzie is surprised to find that all fae do not share this view.

The love triangle….

McKenzie and Kyol go back a long time, but McKenzie has always known that there can never be a happy ending for them. Or can it?
Enter Aren, sexy and smoldering. McKenzie fights the attraction she feels for him, denying it even. . .

I thoroughly enjoyed the Shadow Reader and am very eager to read the sequel in this series!

(read in November 2011)

Adlibris (SE)  |  Bokus (SE)  |  Amazon  |  Kobo  |  Barnes & Noble

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